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Replacing Your Roof or Building a New Home? Here are Reasons to Consider a Slate Roof

Whether it’s time to replace your roof or you’re building a new home, the roof you choose is essential to the longevity and visual appeal of your home. There are many roofing materials to choose from, including asphalt, which is the cheapest and most common, to tile and slate, which are more expensive.

In this article, we look at the slate roof and why it’s a good value for the price, and why you should consider this option when choosing a new roof for your home.

What is a Slate Roof?

Slate tiles are constructed from rock which comes from volcanic ash and clay. Slate roofs are among the oldest used and date back centuries because of the availability of the material and the longevity of the tiles. There are slate roofs built hundreds of years ago that still hold up to this day.

There are two types of slate roofs available — hard and soft. The hard variety is strong and durable, making it ideal for areas that experience harsh weather. Hard slate tiles are also fire resistant and don’t absorb water, which makes them less prone to warping.

The soft slate tile isn’t as durable as the hard slate, but it does retain the fire and water resistance of hard slate. People may opt for the soft variety because it is somewhat less expensive while providing much of the same advantages.

How Long Do Slate Roofs Last?

As mentioned, slate roofs can last for a hundred years or more with proper care and maintenance, and many factors come into play when discussing the longevity of a slate roof. On average, a well-maintained slate roof in ideal conditions lasts about 60 years.

Weather plays a significant factor in the longevity of slate roofing tiles, and you will have to replace the underlay about every 30-40 years to maintain the health of the roof and the integrity of the tiles. Also, the longevity is mostly dependent on the maintenance you do, taking care to fix small problems before they turn into large ones down the road.

What is the Cost of a Slate Roof?

One reason many people steer clear of slate roofs is the cost, and to be fair, it is one of the more expensive roofing tiles you can buy. If your current home has a slate roof, the cost to upkeep it is minimal, and you likely won’t have any large expenditures during ownership.

However, if you’re installing a brand new slate roof, you can expect to pay about $1,500 per square, and in roofing terms, a square is a 10×10 foot area. By way of comparison, asphalt shingles typically cost about $200 per square, so you can see why so many people opt for asphalt over slate.

Another thing to consider when talking about the cost is the installation. Asphalt shingles are ubiquitous, and almost every contractor is familiar with this material. Because it’s so widely available, and because of its familiarity, the labor cost to install an asphalt roof is relatively cheap compared to more exotic materials such as slate or concrete.

Also, since not every roofing contractor is skilled at installing slate, you need to hire one who has the experience, which means higher labor costs. You don’t want to cut corners on a slate roof installation because doing so will cost you more money in repairs due to a shoddy job down the road.

what is slate roofing

Common Issues with Slate Roofs

While slate roofs sound like the perfect option, if you want a long-lasting roof that offers protection against fire and the elements, there are some disadvantages to installing these as well.

Cost

The major disadvantage, as mentioned above, is the cost of the tiles themselves and the cost of labor for installation. Depending on the type of slate you decide to install, the roof can cost anywhere from $1,000 to $6,000 a square installed. Also, as mentioned, not every roofing contractor has experience installing slate roofs, which makes it more difficult to find a qualified installer in some areas.

Thickness of Tiles Can Be Uneven

Another disadvantage to slate tiles it that they’re sometimes not gauged, which means the thickness varies from tile to tile.

Slate Tiles are Heavy

The weight of the roof is also something to consider. Slate tiles are heavy, and the deck of the roof needs reinforcing to deal with the weight. Slate roofs can weigh up to 1,500 pounds, and you’ll need an inspection of your roof’s support system to make sure it can handle the weight before you go down that road.

Difficult to Find Tile Replacements

Finally, slate roofing tiles can become damaged if you have roofers who have to go up and work on the roof. If tiles get broken, it can be challenging to find a replacement that matches the exact color.

Do you Need a Contractor to Fix your Slate Roof?

The best advice if you want to keep your slate roof in tip-top condition is to hire a professional when you need fixing or maintenance; however, because of the high cost, you can usually handle minor repairs and fixes yourself if you know what you’re doing. When you have your slate roof installed, ask the roofing contractor if they offer a maintenance package or maintenance services to keep the roof in shape.

The good news is because slate doesn’t warp, corrode, or attract mold, it doesn’t require as much maintenance like other roofing materials. Make sure you keep trees that overhang the roof trimmed to avoid any damage caused by falling branches and be aware of animals that may climb up on the roof and crack the tiles. Other than that, you should be fine.

Slate is a gorgeous and durable roofing material that is sure to give your home value and curb appeal. If you’re willing to shell out the high up-front expense and take care of it, you will have a roof that will likely last your entire lifetime.

 

 

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How to Get Rid of Moss on Your Roof

You may think a bit of moss growth on your roof adds character to your home, but that green carpet covering your shingles can wreak havoc on your roof. Moss grows in areas that get little to no sunlight but a decent amount of moisture buildup. This is why you will typically see moss growing on the north side of trees, fence posts and yes, roofs.

But no matter where you see moss growing on your roof you should address it as quickly as you can to avoid damages.

The Dangers of Moss Growth

In nature, moss plays its part. But on man-made structures, moss can have a devastating effect. Moss grows in blankets and establishes its roots on the shingling of your roof. These roots can actually start to lift your roofing shingles and deteriorate them over time. This will result in the immediate need to spend money and replace broken or damaged shingles.

In the long run, though, shingles that have been lifted up by moss roots can expose the underlayer of your roof to moisture which can cause even more damage. This is the beginning of roof erosion.

This exposure to moisture can cause mold and bacteria growth, which can eat away at your roofing and cause leaks and holes. Not to mention the respiratory health issues caused by breathing in mold. The exposed roofing can allow water and moisture into your inner roofing structure and even your home.

Besides the structural and health dangers that moss can lead to, it is dangerous to walk on a roof that is covered in moss because it can be very slippery. If you feel that moss on your roof has already caused significant damage, reach out to a roofing company to check it out for you. On the other hand, you just need to get the moss off your roof but no damage has been done, keep on reading!

cleaning moss on roof

Getting Rid of Moss and Dispelling Popular Misconceptions

So you are aware of the dangers and are ready to get rid of your moss but which method should be used. First, some misconceptions about getting moss off your roof should be addressed:

  • Bleach – It is often recommended that homeowners use bleach to weaken and wash away moss. This is a method that needs to be executed very carefully for it to be a viable option. That’s because bleach is very corrosive and can eat away at your flashing, which can cause leaks in the future. Bleach can also discolor your shingles, making them look uneven or older than they actually are. Your vapor barrier can be compromised if you spray your roof with bleach and there are broken or cracked shingles. Bleach will kill moss, but it can also kill other plants and vegetation that you did not intend to kill.
  • Pressure Washing – Pressure washing your moss away should only be done if you are very experienced with the practice. Pressure washers can cause more damage to your roofing and shingles than moss and in much less time.

Both of these methods are still technically viable, but you have to be way more careful with them than other methods such as:

  • Hand Scrubbing – You can start by gathering your garden hose and a sturdy scrubbing brush and wetting down the moss affected areas moderately. When the moss is good and soft, you can go to work on them with the scrubbing brush.
  • Roof Cleaning Solutions – If scrubbing isn’t enough, you may want to consider a ready-made roof cleaning solution. Many roof cleaners are moss and mildew specific. Some can be mixed with water and applied to the affected areas without having to rinse. They work by killing the moss so that it deteriorates and fades away altogether. Other store-bought solutions can be hooked up to your hose and sprayed on the moss-covered section of your roof. If you don’t feel comfortable doing this yourself, see if you can find a roofing contractor near you to clean it professionally.
  • Home Made Solutions – There are also safe home roof cleaning solutions you can make. One of them is a mixture of 8 ounces of dish soap (you can replace the dish soap with 1 and a half to 3 and a half cups of vinegar) and 2 gallons of water. You can apply this mixture with a garden sprayer or backpack sprayer.

Keeping Moss off Your Roof

Now that you have the moss off of your roof, it’s time to think about prevention, so you don’t have to tackle this chore again. Here are some ways you can prevent moss from growing on your roof:

  • Trim Trees – One of the simplest ways to ensure that moss doesn’t grow on your roof is addressing a root cause: lack of sunshine. Moss can’t grow where the sun goes so make sure you trim overhanging limbs from trees and branches that are blocking direct sunlight from your roof.
  • Zinc and Copper Strips – Applying a bit of science can go a long way. Zinc and copper are the natural enemies of moss. Pick up some zinc or copper strips from your local hardware store and place them under the uppermost layer of shingling on your roof.
  • Clean you Gutters – Gutters that are clogged with leaves and plant debris are a breeding ground for moss. Keeping your gutters clean will lessen the likelihood of moss growing on your roof and soffits.
  • Clean your Roof – Moss needs a substrate, such as dirt, to grow in the first place, so cleaning your roof once or twice a year is a great way to prevent moss growth. After each cleaning, you can also put some baking soda on the ridgeline of your roof since the baking soda will make an unsuitably high pH condition in which moss cannot grow.

What Is Roof Certification?

Roof certification is conducted by a licensed roofer who inspects the roof to assess its condition. Typically, this inspection is performed on the exterior as well as the interior of the roof. The inspector takes down information as well as photographs from a variety of angles to determine if there are leaks or other damage and then gives you an estimate on the state of the roof.

This process is helpful for people who are looking at purchasing a new home and don’t want to get stuck with expensive roofing repairs in a year.

Keep in mind. However, a roof certification isn’t a guarantee, but rather the opinion of the roofer you hired to do the job. Two different roofing contractors may give two different opinions regarding the state of your roof, so be aware of that fact when deciding whether or not to pay for the service.

When to Get a Roof Certification

When you’re in the market for a new home, one thing you’re going to want to know is how stable is the roof of the house you’re looking to purchase. The last thing you want is to buy a home and to find out a year later that the roof leaks and is need of replacement.

roofing companies

You should know that in many cases, a roof inspection isn’t included in the routine inspection of the house, and the condition of the roof may not be written down in your contract, and depending on where you live, your seller may not have to repair the roof before selling you the home.

Having said all that, a roofing certification isn’t always necessary. For example, depending on the market and your need to buy a home, you might find your dream property that happens to have a shoddy roof. If the price is right, then you might forego the roofing certification and just factor in a new roof to your budget. If, on the other hand, the market favors the buyer, you can opt for a roofing certification in the event that you might find an issue, which can drive down the price.

Another thing to keep in mind is that, in some cases, your homeowner’s insurance company may require you to get a roofing certification before they issue you a policy for the home you’re purchasing.

Do You Really Need a Roof Certification?

As mentioned above, you don’t need a roofing certification, however, it can be a good idea to get one to assess the state of the roof and let you know if you’re going to have to begin saving for a new roof now or if it’s something you can put off until later. Also, as stated, a roofing certification isn’t a guarantee, it’s an opinion of the particular contractor you hired to do the job. While one contractor might tell you the roof has a good three to five years left, another one might see things differently and suggest that you replace the roof as soon as possible.

In many cases, getting a roof certification is like getting a diagnosis from a doctor; you may want to get a second opinion just to be sure, especially when you’re talking about the expense of putting on a new roof.

How Do Roofing Certifications Work?

When you hire a roofer to perform a roofing certification, they’ll consider a variety of factors to determine whether or not your roof is in good shape and will stand up over time. Your roofer will look at:

  • The type of roof and materials used
  • How old is the roof
  • The roof’s pitch
  • How many layers are involved
  • Any prior roofing repairs
  • All of this information will be documented along with photographs of any problem areas that go into the contractor’s final determination.

Benefits of a Roof Certification

So, you don’t always need a roofing certification, and getting one is no guarantee that the roof is going to last as long as the inspector says, however, there are many benefits to getting one.

  • Detect Water Damage It’s tough to tell just by looking at the exterior of the roof whether there’s been any water damage, but a good inspector will see it and let you know if it’s going to involve a major or minor repair to fix it.
  • Saves Money Although you’re going to be shelling out money for the cost of hiring a roofing inspector, it’s peanuts when compared to the money you can save by detecting small problems before they become big, expensive fixes down the road.
  • Provides Protection As stated, getting a roofing certification gives you a degree of protection should it come time to file a roofing claim with your homeowner’s insurance company. Also in that regards, if you’ve been through a rough storm that’s caused damage to your home, a roofing certification will prove beneficial when dealing with your insurance company because you’ll have an expert’s idea of just how severe the damage is.
  • Extends Roof’s Lifespan It’s a good idea to have regular inspections performed on your roof because it allows you to find problems and fix them quickly. Little issues like broken shingles or water damage can be repaired relatively inexpensively, but if you let them go, they can become much more expensive to fix down the road.

What a Roofing Certification Isn’t

It’s important to keep in mind that a roofing certification isn’t a guarantee or a warranty on your roof — it’s just a person’s opinion. Remember that just because you have a roofing certification that says your roof is good for another three years, your roofing contractor likely won’t honor that if your roof suffered damage due to a natural disaster or damage caused by a worker installing a satellite dish.

A roofing certification is an excellent way to give you an idea as to the state of the roof, and it’s a quick and relatively inexpensive process that you should consider when you’re looking at purchasing a new home.

 

Common Roofing Problems & Their Solutions

Your roof is one of the most critical parts of your house because it’s your first line of defense against the elements. If your roof is in tip-top shape, you’ll be well protected against rain, hail, snow, and ice. However, when your roof becomes damaged, you’re likely to experience water leaks, mold, mildew, and other problems. Also, a roof that’s in good shape helps the resale value of your home.

Lastly, your roof keeps your energy costs down. If you have an efficient roof, you can save money on your heating and cooling bills, however, an inefficient roof is going to cost you year in and year out.

In this article, we’re going to take a look at the most common roofing problems, and how to fix them, so your roof remains in great shape and continues to offer superior protection year after year.

A leaky roof is one of the most common problems affecting roofs everywhere, and the symptoms are readily apparent with just a visual inspection. If you see stains across your ceilings or running down your walls, or if you notice the buildup of mold and mildew, chances are a leaky roof is the culprit. Roof leaks are caused by many factors, such as age, the slope of the roof, damage due to severe weather or debris, or improper sealing of roof vents.

roof repair

Roof Leaks

Once you’ve seen water damage, you’ll have to trace the stains back to the source, which often is in the attic. If you’re able, run water over the roof with a hose and see if you can spot where the leak is occurring.

Once you’ve determined what is causing the leak, repair it. In some instances, a leaky roof can be repaired by merely replacing damaged or missing shingles with new ones. Cracked asphalt shingles can be repaired with roof sealant as a temporary fix until you can replace them. If you’re using wood shakes, replace any that are damaged.

Flashing That Are Incorrectly Installed

Flashing seals the roof where it’s been penetrated with things like vents, chimneys, and cooling systems. If the flashing wasn’t installed correctly, the seams would open and allow water to come in or shingles to blow away.

Repairing roof flashing isn’t too difficult, and if you’re handy, you can do it yourself. Small holes can be quickly patched with roofing cement, and more massive holes can be repaired by using a patch of the same material the original flashing is made from.

However, in cases where the flashing is severely damaged or if the hole is too large, it will have to be replaced. In this case, you may want to call in a professional roofer to do the job and get a guarantee that the job is done right.

Damaged Soffit

Soffit is the material that connects your roof’s overhang with the side of your house. This material is both functional and aesthetic, but it’s vital to your roof’s function and the protection of your home.

Like many roofing problems, soffit becomes damaged due to water, and improperly installed gutters are a significant cause of this water damage. When the gutters aren’t properly removing water from the roof, the water sits on the edge of the shingles and eventually drips down to rot the soffit.

If the soffit is severely damaged, you’ll be able to see the rot plainly. However, early signs of soffit damage are bubbles under the paint and watermarks.

To replace the damaged soffit, you should call in a professional to replace the rotted wood and design the soffit to match the style and look of the remaining soffit and house.

Animals

Yes, animals are also a significant problem when it comes to roofing problems. Even if your roof is weatherproof against hail and driving winds, they’re often no match for the critters that like to nest there.

Common animals that cause roofing damage are:

  • Squirrels
  • Birds
  • Mice
  • Raccoons
  • Rats
  • Bats

Most of these animals seek the warmth and shelter provided by the attic, and they’ll use any means necessary to burrow in through the roof to get there. Animals can also find their way in through damaged soffit or vents.

And damaging your roof is only the beginning. Once inside the house, the animals can damage wiring and chew up wood.

To protect your roof against animals, make it tough for them to get onto the roof in the first place. That means trimming any branches that hang over the roof and make sure your gutters are clean to prevent birds from nesting there.

Also, inspect your attic regularly and look for signs of animals such as droppings or nesting material.

Depending on the type of infestation you have, you may have to call in an exterminator for help and repair the damage once the animal has been disposed of.

Damaged Shingles

Since roof leaks are a major headache for homeowners, damaged shingles are one of the major causes of a leaky roof. Shingles become damaged due to age or due to weather.

Depending on the type of shingle you have, the years of heat and cold can cause them to blister and crack, which leads to water leaking in. If you have an older roof, it’s vital that you perform regular inspections to ensure that the shingles are intact and in good shape. If you find any that need repair, take care of that at once because letting it go can lead to more significant, more expensive repairs down the road.

Lack of Maintenance

As with anything, problems arise and get worse because people don’t perform proper or frequent maintenance. Your roof can last a long time if you take time once or twice a year to inspect it and fix those little problems now.

The more attention you pay to your roof, the longer it’s going to last, and the less you’re going to have to spend on it throughout the years. And the less you have to deal with any roofers

Getting a Roof Replacement? Here’s How To Save Some Money

A roof is expensive, but a necessary investment for your home. And when it comes time to replace your roof, you want the best quality, but you also want to get a reasonable price as well.

It’s estimated that a typical asphalt roofing job for a residential home can range from $8,000 to $16,500. And while there are a variety of factors that go into determining the price, we’re going to take a look at ways you can save a few bucks without sacrificing quality work.

Research & Learn

Thanks to the Internet, you have access to virtually every piece of information regarding roofing. Before you even talk to a roofing contractor, research materials, labor costs, and terminology, so you know exactly what you agree to when you negotiate. Also, keep in mind that you’ll likely have disposal fees and recycling fees to contend with when tearing down your old roof, so make sure you know approximately what those should be in your area before you agree to a price. Being informed means, you’re less likely to be taken advantage of.

Get a Roof Inspection

Getting a professional to come in and expect your roof is an excellent idea because it gives you a clear picture of the work that needs to be done. We’re not saying that all contractors are shady, far from it, but it’s better to know the work that needs to be performed by a third party rather than someone who may be trying to get a little more money out of you by selling you on something you may not need.

Getting a roofing inspector is relatively inexpensive, and you can generally get one for under $300. An inspector will be able to pinpoint any damage and advise you on whether you need a full-on roof replacement or if you can get by with a minor repair for now.

Lastly, when you hire an inspector, make sure you get someone who’s not associated with a company you may employ to do the work. As we said, they may not be as unbiased in their recommendation as you would like.

Repair or Replace

This goes hand-in-hand with getting a roof inspection because a proper inspection will help you decide whether you need a full-blown replacement or if you can get by with a repair. In many cases, what seems like a significant problem such as water leakage can be fixed with relatively inexpensive repairs.

Of course, you’ll eventually have to replace your roof at some point, but there’s no reason for spending the money now if you don’t have to. Repairing now allows you to begin setting aside money for when you’re going to replace it down the road.

Check For Warranties

Depending on when you purchased your home, there may be a warranty that’s attached to the roof from a previous replacement. If you don’t have this information, contact the previous owners and ask. Some roofs also come with manufacturer’s warranties, so be sure to check for that as well.

Depending on whether your roof has any warranty coverage will determine how much you have to spend to repair or replace it.

Get Plenty of Estimates

Just like when you’re shopping for a vehicle, it’s a good idea to shop around to try and get the best price. Most people have access to a variety of roofing contractors where they live, and you’re not doing anything wrong by getting estimates from all of them. Ask if they offer any warranties on their work and be careful of extremely low bids because that might indicate that you’re going to get substandard work.

Also, depending on how long you’ve lived in the neighborhood, you should ask your neighbors who they recommend to do the work. Chances are someone on your street had a roof replaced and will gladly point you in the right direction.

roof replacement

Check Out Financing Options

Because roof replacement can be so expensive, many of us don’t have that kind of cash laying around, and putting it on a credit card isn’t always the best option unless you have an amazing interest rate.

So, check out to see what financing options are available either through your bank or through the roofing manufacturer.

Of course, unless the roof is entirely shot, you’re probably better off doing a minor roof repair that’s going to buy you a year or two, and then begin budgeting so you can pay cash for that roof in a few years instead of having to finance and pay the extra fees.

Consider Alternate Materials

Just because your home came with an asphalt roof doesn’t mean you have to stick with that. True, asphalt is the most common and least expensive roofing material, which will save you money, but often there are incentives for going with different material such as something more energy efficient. You may get tax breaks and breaks on your homeowner’s insurance depending on the material you choose. And, you may end up getting a roof that lasts longer, which means you’ll save money from not having to replace it more frequently.

Consider The Timing

Most people opt for putting roofs on in the summer or early fall, which is when the contractors are the busiest, which means you’ll pay more. If you time your roofing project for early spring or early winter, you’ll likely get a much better deal on the labor.

DIY

If you’re handy, and if you have the time, try doing some of the work yourself. Removing the old roofing material before your contractor begins work saves them time and saves you money on labor costs.

Any way you slice it, a new roof is going to be expensive, but with a little planning, a little education and consideration, you can get a price that’s easier to handle than if you went in blind and went with the first estimate you were given.

 

 

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What Are The Different Types Of Impact Resistant Roofing?

A Plano roofer says, living in the great state of Texas has many advantages, but it has some drawbacks, too. One particular problem living here is the challenge of protecting your home against those yearly hailstorms that are so common in this part of the country.

Nearly 50% of all homeowner claims to insurance company comes as a result of damage caused by hail. Across the nation, total claims in property and crop damage from hail total $1 billion annually. Most of these claims come from the states Texas, Oklahoma, Nebraska, and Kansas.

At 80 to 100 mph of force, hail is one of the most destructive natural forces against even the most solidly built roofs. In an effort to cut back on claims, insurance companies have started to offer incentives for homeowners choosing to install impact-resistant roofing.

What Is Impact Resistant Roofing?

Roofing materials are rated based on their ability to absorb high impact contact from hail or flying debris. The weakest material receives a rating of one, and the material that can absorb the most impact enjoys a 4 rating. Most roofing material with a class 4 impact rating is considered impact-resistant roofing. A soundly built roof with class 1 material will not last long in a hail prone or high weather area, no matter how much care and attention was put into its construction.

What Are The Different Types Of Impact Resistant Roofing?

Asphalt

The most common type of roofing is asphalt shingles because of its affordability and ease of install. Likewise, the most common impact-resistant roofing also comes in the form of asphalt shingles. Depending on the manufacturer, these shingles have some degree of rubberized backing to increase the amount of bounce, thereby making it better able to absorb the impact of hail coming in at 80 to 100 mph.

TPO

Other options include rubberized slate shingles, which are basically rubber shingles made to resemble the look of slate. It’s also called TPO, or Thermoplastic Polyolefin. It’s installed in a similar manner as slate shingles and has a natural bounce similar to impact-resistant asphalt shingles. TPO shingles come with a 50-year warranty and a 100-year life expectancy.

Slate

Slate is considered impact-resistant. However, you’ll need to pay attention to the thickness of the slate you’re choosing. 5/8″ slate typically receives a Class-4 rating, making it impact resistant. 1/4″ slate is not as strong, and will usually come with a class 3 rating.

Metal

Metal roofs come with many advantages such as energy efficiency, curb appeal, and environmental friendliness. Perhaps the most significant benefit is that they are naturally very resistant to hail. Most metal roofs come with a class 4 rating.

How Much Extra Can You Expect To Pay?

Prices vary depending on the specific type of impact-resistant roofing. Labor costs should remain fixed whether you’re installing traditional roofing or impact-resistant roofing. This includes stripping the old roof down to the deck, inspecting and fortifying the deck, installing the new roof, and hauling the debris away.

The only change in the price you should expect when you’re moving from a traditional roof in one material to an impact-resistant roof in the same type of material is a shift in material price. To determine how much you should expect the cost to jump, do your homework ahead of time. Price out the different material options per foot, so you know what you should expect when asking for an estimate from a roofer.

Is Impact Resistant Roofing Worth The Cost?

No roof is hail proof. But impact-resistant roofs do a much better job protecting your home than a class 1 or 2 roofs featured on most homes. If you live in a heavy weather region of the country where your roof takes an awful lot of impact abuse, then you may want to consider installing one.

In these areas insurance companies usually offer a discount on insurance premiums as an incentive for purchasing an impact-resistant roof. Typical discounts range around the 20% mark.

But, a word of caution here. Look for loopholes. Some insurance companies will not cover cosmetic damage to the roof. This is particularly important to know for anyone choosing a metal roof option. Dings and dents may not be of concern to an insurance provider.

Depending on how much more you pay for an impact-resistant roof, you should be able to make up the difference in cost within a few years if your insurance company has given you a discounted premium. Also, the installation of an impact-resistant roof will up the value of your home, which helps you recover some of those expenses when the time comes to sell.

How Is Impact Resistant Roofing Installed?

This type of roofing is installed in much the same way as other roofing. Impact-resistant shingles are installed with a nearly identical method to traditional shingles:

  • remove overhanging branches
  • strip roof down to the decking
  • inspect the roof for damage
  • renail roof deck
  • seal roof deck against water intrusion
  • install flashing
  • install high impact shingles
  • install roof vents

How To Choose An Impact Resistant Roof

A few factors need to be taken into consideration when choosing an impact-resistant roof: budget, resale value.

Budget

Asphalt shingles tend to be the most economical choice for roofing, including impact-resistant roofing. It’s an excellent choice for those who may have tighter budgets, those who already have shingle roofs, and those who live in neighborhoods where asphalt shingle roofs are standard.

Resale Value

Second to budget is resale value. Choosing an impact-resistant roof should already increase your home’s value, thereby fetching a higher resale price. However, some particular roofs are more desirable than others. And some materials are not as appealing to potential buyers. Do some research to see what’s popular in your area, and what particular materials will up the resale price of your home.

Aesthetics

If you are counting on living in your home for the next twenty years or so, you may want a roof that will protect you well and be aesthetically pleasing. Everyone has different tastes in roofing whether it be slate, metal, or asphalt shingles.

Take into consideration your budget, potential insurance discounts, peace of mind knowing you’re protected, resale value, and personal preference when deciding whether or not to make your next roof an impact-resistant one.

Common Types of Roof Damage to Look Out For

Your roof is one of the most critical parts of your home because it’s the barrier between you and the elements. Because of its importance in protecting your home, and because it’s constantly exposed to the weather, your roof will wear out in time and become damaged.

Knowing that your roof will become damaged, it’s essential that you conduct regular inspections to assess that damage and catch and rectify small problems before they turn into massive, expensive fixes.

In this article, we’re going to look at several types of roof damage and how to know when it’s time to call a roof repair company.

 

Cracks in Your Roof

If your roof is comprised of wood, tile, or asphalt shingles, then it’s more likely to develop cracks than roofs made from other materials such as slate or metal.

Roofs made from these materials suffer cracks mainly due to high winds, so if you live in an area that’s affected by storms in the summer months, it’s a good idea to perform regular inspections after the season to see if there’s any damage due to flying debris that’s impacted the roof.

To look for cracks, get up on the roof and note any damaged or missing shingles. This damage can be shingles that are split, curled, or blown entirely away.

The good news is that if there’s light damage (a few shingles), then the roof repair won’t be that expensive.

The key is to assess the damage regularly and not wait until a few small cracks that are easy to fix becomes an entire roof replacement that can cost in the thousands.

 

Roof Damage Due To Heat

If you live in a hot climate or a region that experiences hot summers, then your roof is susceptible to heat damage. Find professionals that are experienced with hot climates, like a Plano roofing company.

 Intense heat from the sun beating down on your roof for days on end causes cracks and curls in your roof’s shingles depending on the material used. Asphalt shingles and wood are among the most susceptible to heat damage, while metal, rubber, and clay are your best bet if you live in a hot climate. 

As with damage due to winds, you need to inspect your roof for damage regularly. Look for shingles that have shrunk due to the heat; you can spot this by seeing any nails that have popped up from below causing blisters to the shingles. Also, be aware that intense heat can affect the wood rafters, causing the joints to expand, which can lead to leaks.

 

Water Damage on Your Roof

Your roof bears the brunt of everything Mother Nature has to throw at it, which includes heavy rains and storms. Water is an incredibly destructive force when it comes to roofing and wreaks havoc on your home once it gets inside in the form of mold.

If the area in which you live gets heavy rain and snow on a regular basis, then it’s vital that you conduct periodic inspections on your roof.

What to look for when it comes to water damage is pooling water or water accumulation after heavy rain. This pooling occurs mainly in the attic. Also, check the ceilings for any sign of discoloration, which may indicate a water leak. Water spots can also appear on the exterior walls of your home as well, so when inspecting your roof, also do a quick walk around the house and look for spots.

If you do find any water in the home, or signs of damage outside, it’s vital that you call in professionals to do a more thorough inspection and recommend a roof repair as quickly as possible.

As mentioned, water damage can lead to serious health problems with mold and mildew, and it gets more expensive to repair the longer you wait.

 

Object Damage

When we speak of object damage, we mean physical objects that strike the roof due to high winds or an accident.

In most cases, object damage is caused during storms when tree branches and other objects are blown against the roof, but sometimes repair crews can inadvertently cause damage by dropping tools or being careless with equipment.

As before, it’s a good idea to check your roof for signs of damage at least once a season. Do a thorough inspection inside and outside and look for cracked, loose, blistered, or missing shingles.

It’s important to remember that most roof damage — when caught early — can be repaired quickly and at little expense. The last thing you want is to wait until the problem gets big enough that you need an entirely new roof.

 

Neglect

As much as all of the above can lead to roof damage, perhaps the number one cause is neglect. With proper maintenance, regular checkups, and repairs, your roof should last up to 30 years depending on the materials used.

Neglecting your roof when it becomes damaged radically shortens its lifespan and leads to more substantial expenses down the road. Even if your roof came with a warranty or if you have homeowners insurance it doesn’t mean you’re in the clear. Many warranties and policies don’t cover things such as damage due to having a dish or cable installed.

Also, remember that many insurance companies require you to do regular inspections on your roof to ensure it’s properly maintained.

Take care of your roof, and your roof will take care of you.

As mentioned, your roof is on the front line of protecting your home and bears the brunt of all types of weather and climate. While it’s a pain in the butt, and a job that no one likes to do, it’s vital that you regularly inspect your roof and repair small problems before they become large ones.

Your home’s roof not only protects your entire house and its contents, but it also protects your family too. Having a beautiful, well-kept roof enhances your home’s curb appeal, and makes it more attractive to potential buyers should you decide to sell it down the road.

 

 

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The 411 on Tesla’s Solar Roof

With people becoming more conscious about the environment, they’re turning to forms of energy that aren’t based on fossil fuels such as oil and natural gas. Solar power and electricity derived from solar and wind are poised to become a significant source of the nation’s energy in the future.

Solar panels for roofs have been around for a while, but Tesla is trying to make that technology better by creating solar tiles that look like traditional roofing tiles but maintain the same energy-gathering properties of unsightly solar panels.

Their main product to do this with is the Tesla Solar Roof Tiles, which are near as energy-efficient as traditional solar but look a heck of a lot better on your home.

In this article, we’re going to look at the Tesla Solar Roof, how they work, and why they might be the right choice for the homeowner.

 

What Are Tesla Roof Panels?

As mentioned, the Tesla solar roof panels look like most traditional roof shingles (terracotta, slate, asphalt) with one key difference: each tile contains a solar cell, which produces electricity. This is advantageous for two reasons: One, the roof looks like a traditional roof and not like most solar panels, which while functional, aren’t very attractive. And two, this system is capable of collecting up to 98 percent of the energy from the sun that is collected by traditional solar panels. This means that you get nearly all of the benefits of a solar roof without the appearance.

Although the technology behind the Tesla Solar Roof Panels is kept a secret, the principle is the same when compared to traditional solar panels. Traditional panels are constructed of a group of solar cells, which alone don’t gather much power. However, when you group these cells into what the industry calls “modules” you significantly increase the amount of energy generated from each panel.

These panels gather energy from the sun and charge batteries located in the home, which supply the electricity you need for your appliances and other systems.

 

How Much Do They Cost?

There’s no other way to say it: these panels are premium. They’re made out of quartz layers, which are meant to be virtually indestructible.

As with any roofing system, the cost of installation depends on many factors, but Tesla says these tiles will cost about $21.85 per square foot. By way of comparison, many traditional asphalt shingle roofing tiles cost about $5 per square foot.

Keep in mind that with the large upfront expense, you’re going to save money over time by lowering your electric bill.

Another thing to consider is that, according to Tesla CEO, Elon Musk, his solar roof panels have a “quasi-infinite lifetime.” This means that if you install a Tesla roof, you’re not likely to ever have to replace it in your lifetime and neither will the next owners of the house. This fact is a major selling point if you decide to sell your home in the future.

 

Are They Worth it?

Even though the Tesla roofing panels aren’t widely available for consumer purchase, they’re going to be a tough sell for the average homeowner to consider when they’re eventually released for the mass market due to the high upfront installation costs.

To alleviate the costs of solar, many homeowners can qualify for a 30 percent Solar Investment Tax Credit, which is a federal policy designed to help further and support the installation of solar energy products in the United States. This credit makes the installation of expensive solar panels and solar roofs an easier pill to swallow.

 

How Much do They Save You?

Actual savings vary from house to house, and overall savings depend on a variety of factors: how many hours of sunlight are available, local electric rates and your total power usage are among the factors. However, most experts agree that you will save money if you implement a solar roof or solar panels into your house.

Here’s an example of what to expect: It’s estimated that average U.S. household electric usage is 11,000-kilowatt-hours (kWh), and the average rate for electricity is $0.1301 kWh. Multiply the two, and we see the average American home spends $1,430 a year on electricity. Another thing to consider is that electric rates, in general, increase at a rate of about 2% a year.

When you generate your electricity, you bypass all of these costs and inflation. The only cost you incur is the cost of installation and any power you need should the system not supply your total electricity needs.

 

The Bottom Line

While Tesla demoed their solar roof tiles back in October of 2016, they’ve only been reported to be installed on 12 homes, all of which are in Northern California, and while the company is accepting $1,000 deposits for these roofing tiles, they’re not ready to begin mass production. The company also built a factory in Buffalo, NY, but that isn’t running at full capacity yet.

Still, even with the delay in Tesla’s getting up to speed with their solar roof panels, the landscape for solar energy is ripe and buyers are eager to make the jump to cleaner, more natural forms of energy.

Solar power doubled in 2016 over the previous year, and it’s estimated that 40% of new power generation applications came from solar technology in 2016, and that trend continues to go up as solar power, and solar electric generation is predicted to rise to 36% by 2050. By then, solar panels for commercial roofing may even be available!

If you’re considering adding Tesla Solar Tiles or some other form of solar to your home, think whether you’re in need of a total roof replacement, in which case the Tesla panels may be your best option, or whether you need an upgrade, and can make do with a panel array. Either way, if you can suffer through the expensive installation costs, you’ll get that back and more in what you save on electricity through the years.

 

 

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The Importance of Roof Vents on Your Home

Most people don’t think about roof vents, but the fact is they’re a vital part of your home’s ventilation system, and they’re an essential part of keeping your roof (whether in commercial roofing or residential) healthy and in proper working order for many years.

In this article, we’re going to take a look at the function of roof vents, how to install them, and why they’re vital to your house.

 

The Purpose of Roof Vents

When you think of your home’s ventilation system, it helps to think of it in terms of air intake and exhaust. Intake and exhaust are what facilitates airflow throughout the house. But what does this have to do with your roof?

Well, everyone knows that hot air rises, and in the house, the hot air naturally rises to the attic. This is known as the stack effect, and it creates high pressure within the attic. To ventilate, you need cool air coming in. This ventilation ensures that the hot air doesn’t linger in the attic, which can cause damage to your roof.

 

Roof Vents Protect Against Damage

As previously mentioned, roof vents and proper house ventilation protects both your roof and your house against damage. But what kind of damage are we talking about?

For starters, have you ever seen houses with icicles stretching down from the gutters or the edges of the roof? This is called an ice dam, and the cause is the heat that’s built up in the attic combining with the heat from the sun to melt the snow that’s sitting on your roof.

When the snow melts, the water runs down and — depending on how cold it is — begins to freeze again, causing the icicles. This ice buildup can cause water damage that occurs underneath the shingles, which can lead to major leaks down the road. When you have a good ventilation system, the hot air in your home is pumped out before it melts the ice and snow. Roof vents are also beneficial in the summer months to dissipate heat that builds up in the attic — heat that can loosen joints and warp supports.

 

Roof Vents Save You Money

Your roof is a magnet for everything that Mother Nature throws at it, and that includes the sun’s hot rays. When the sun’s rays hit your roof — and depending on the materials used in your roof — it can act as a solar oven. The buildup of heat coming from your roof and into your attic causes your home’s air conditioning unit to work harder to cool the house, which costs you more money.

Having a proper roof ventilation system ensures that hot air doesn’t build up in your attic.

In addition to saving you money on your home’s electric bill, having a good ventilation system ensures that the temperature in your house stays even throughout the house. If you’ve ever been in the attic or upstairs and swore it was 10 degrees hotter than the downstairs, it’s a sign you may need adequate ventilation to even out the temperatures.

 

How Much Ventilation Is Enough?

The number of roof vents you’ll need depends on several factors including how big the house is. A good way to determine the number of vents required is to use a formula in which you provide for one sq. ft. of vent space for every 150 sq. ft. of attic space. Most experts also recommend placing half of your vents near the bottom of the roof and the other half near the top to provide a healthy airflow.

 

Types of Roof Vents

Once you’ve determined how many vents you’re going to need to cool your attic properly, you’ll have to decide what types of roof vents you’re going to purchase.

There are many different types to choose from including ridge vents, gable vents, and soffit vents. Also, some vents are motorized while the wind powers others. Of all the vents available, neither one is superior to the rest; you’ll have to choose the best vent for your particular situation.

If you’re unsure about which type of vent to buy, it may be beneficial to call in a roofing contractor who can recommend the best system based on your home’s airflow needs.

The most common type of roof vent is the basic low profile box vent. This vent is unobtrusive and can be matched to the color of your roof so they blend in better. This ventilation system is passive, which means it’s not motorized, making it relatively inexpensive and easy to install.

 

Installing Roof Vents

If you’ve determined you need roof vents you have two options: hire a professional roofing contractor or do it yourself.

Installing roof vents isn’t particularly expensive, and the national average dictates that the job can be done for just under $500. Still, if you’re handy with tools, and want to save some money, installing a basic, passive roof vent system is pretty easy.

The first thing you’ll want to do is figure out where on the roof you want to install the vent keeping in mind that you’ll wish to vents at both the bottom and the top of the roof. Next, mark out on your shingles the dimensions of the vent so you can accurately make your cut. Use a circular saw to cut through the shingles. Once you have your hole cut, place your vent and if you live in an area with high winds, secure it with a bit of roofing cement and nail it down.

While most newer homes have adequate ventilation systems, many older homes don’t. To see if you need better ventilation, check your attic for moisture and excessive heat, which suggests that you need more ventilation. Take note during winter for ice dams that build-up, which also suggests better ventilation is required. A ventilation system not only protects your roof, but it also keeps your energy bills lower, keeps your family more comfortable, and ensures a healthier environment when you’re indoors.

 

 

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Gutters & Downspouts

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Downspouts & Gutters in Dallas-Fort Worth Area

Baked Aluminum Colors – Gutters Dallas / Ft Worth

Since we control all aspects of your roofing and gutter job, we can guarantee top-quality performance, and rock-bottom prices! Whether you need new gutters with your re-roofing job, or just need the gutters, we can deliver the best product and service quickly, efficiently, and economically.

Our installers are experienced professionals, able to answer any questions you may have. We offer a variety of options in rain gutter styles and materials as we continuously research new and innovative materials in our industry (i.e. rain chains and gutter guards), allowing us to give our customers the best job possible, backed by the best service. At present, we are installing baked aluminum seamless rain gutters, as well as copper and steel gutters (see choices below)

If you are looking for a quality rain gutter at an affordable price, then aluminum is the right rain gutter system for you. Our aluminum gutter is baked on with a powder coat enamel and is lifetime guaranteed. We carry thirty six colors to match the exterior of your house. The enamel is baked on to both sides of the rain gutter to resist corrosion from the elements and also carries a lifetime guarantee. Installing copper gutters can be tricky and that is why most people prefer to leave the installation to professionals who are experienced in copper gutter installation. A mistake with copper can be very costly.

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