Tag Archives: residential roofing

How to Get Rid of Moss on Your Roof

You may think a bit of moss growth on your roof adds character to your home, but that green carpet covering your shingles can wreak havoc on your roof. Moss grows in areas that get little to no sunlight but a decent amount of moisture buildup. This is why you will typically see moss growing on the north side of trees, fence posts and yes, roofs.

But no matter where you see moss growing on your roof you should address it as quickly as you can to avoid damages.

The Dangers of Moss Growth

In nature, moss plays its part. But on man-made structures, moss can have a devastating effect. Moss grows in blankets and establishes its roots on the shingling of your roof. These roots can actually start to lift your roofing shingles and deteriorate them over time. This will result in the immediate need to spend money and replace broken or damaged shingles.

In the long run, though, shingles that have been lifted up by moss roots can expose the underlayer of your roof to moisture which can cause even more damage. This is the beginning of roof erosion.

This exposure to moisture can cause mold and bacteria growth, which can eat away at your roofing and cause leaks and holes. Not to mention the respiratory health issues caused by breathing in mold. The exposed roofing can allow water and moisture into your inner roofing structure and even your home.

Besides the structural and health dangers that moss can lead to, it is dangerous to walk on a roof that is covered in moss because it can be very slippery. If you feel that moss on your roof has already caused significant damage, reach out to a roofing company to check it out for you. On the other hand, you just need to get the moss off your roof but no damage has been done, keep on reading!

cleaning moss on roof

Getting Rid of Moss and Dispelling Popular Misconceptions

So you are aware of the dangers and are ready to get rid of your moss but which method should be used. First, some misconceptions about getting moss off your roof should be addressed:

  • Bleach – It is often recommended that homeowners use bleach to weaken and wash away moss. This is a method that needs to be executed very carefully for it to be a viable option. That’s because bleach is very corrosive and can eat away at your flashing, which can cause leaks in the future. Bleach can also discolor your shingles, making them look uneven or older than they actually are. Your vapor barrier can be compromised if you spray your roof with bleach and there are broken or cracked shingles. Bleach will kill moss, but it can also kill other plants and vegetation that you did not intend to kill.
  • Pressure Washing – Pressure washing your moss away should only be done if you are very experienced with the practice. Pressure washers can cause more damage to your roofing and shingles than moss and in much less time.

Both of these methods are still technically viable, but you have to be way more careful with them than other methods such as:

  • Hand Scrubbing – You can start by gathering your garden hose and a sturdy scrubbing brush and wetting down the moss affected areas moderately. When the moss is good and soft, you can go to work on them with the scrubbing brush.
  • Roof Cleaning Solutions – If scrubbing isn’t enough, you may want to consider a ready-made roof cleaning solution. Many roof cleaners are moss and mildew specific. Some can be mixed with water and applied to the affected areas without having to rinse. They work by killing the moss so that it deteriorates and fades away altogether. Other store-bought solutions can be hooked up to your hose and sprayed on the moss-covered section of your roof. If you don’t feel comfortable doing this yourself, see if you can find a roofing contractor near you to clean it professionally.
  • Home Made Solutions – There are also safe home roof cleaning solutions you can make. One of them is a mixture of 8 ounces of dish soap (you can replace the dish soap with 1 and a half to 3 and a half cups of vinegar) and 2 gallons of water. You can apply this mixture with a garden sprayer or backpack sprayer.

Keeping Moss off Your Roof

Now that you have the moss off of your roof, it’s time to think about prevention, so you don’t have to tackle this chore again. Here are some ways you can prevent moss from growing on your roof:

  • Trim Trees – One of the simplest ways to ensure that moss doesn’t grow on your roof is addressing a root cause: lack of sunshine. Moss can’t grow where the sun goes so make sure you trim overhanging limbs from trees and branches that are blocking direct sunlight from your roof.
  • Zinc and Copper Strips – Applying a bit of science can go a long way. Zinc and copper are the natural enemies of moss. Pick up some zinc or copper strips from your local hardware store and place them under the uppermost layer of shingling on your roof.
  • Clean you Gutters – Gutters that are clogged with leaves and plant debris are a breeding ground for moss. Keeping your gutters clean will lessen the likelihood of moss growing on your roof and soffits.
  • Clean your Roof – Moss needs a substrate, such as dirt, to grow in the first place, so cleaning your roof once or twice a year is a great way to prevent moss growth. After each cleaning, you can also put some baking soda on the ridgeline of your roof since the baking soda will make an unsuitably high pH condition in which moss cannot grow.

Pros and Cons of a Roof Overlay

As time goes by and your roof goes through normal wear and tear, your roof may be in need of some work. This is something that every homeowner has to go through, especially those who are living in their homes for long periods of time. Your first option would be, of course, replacing the entire roof. But, what you may not be aware of is that you have a completely different option available to you: overlaying. Essentially, overlaying is the practice of putting new shingles on top of the old and damaged shingles that you already have on your home. Overlaying your home, instead of giving your home a brand new roof, can boost your roof’s lifespan while keeping your wallet intact. The choice is up to you as a homeowner and what your needs are. In turn, it is important to weigh the pros and cons in order to understand what the right choice will look like for you.

Pros

If you are dealing with a tight budget, overlaying your roof might be the better option for you. Because you are just adding new shingles onto the old ones, you are not using as many materials as you would when you are implementing an entirely new roof. This keeps more money in your pocket, at least initially. Also, you do not have to hire as much manpower as well then you would when you are replacing your entire roof. When you choose to overlay your roof, there’s definitely a lower upfront cost.

Also, it takes way less time to overlay your roof instead of installing a completely new roof. That means that you will be spending less time in discomfort and dealing with the construction that comes from remodeling your home. This is all dependent on the fact that you have a roof that is in good shape and can handle the weight of an extra roof.

roof overlay

Cons

Overlaying your roof is just like adding another roof on top of your roof. With that action, it means that there is going to be a ton of extra weight added to your home. You have to make sure that your home is able to deal with all this extra weight. For this reason, overlaying might not be the best option for older homes that are not built to deal with the weight of a second roof. Having the look of a second roof may also dip the resale value of your roof as well. It is not exactly the most appealing look that you can give to your home.

An overlayed roof is not going to last as long as a brand new roof. When you overlay it, you are not catering to the problems that might lay underneath. Things like mold, water damage, and broken shingles are going to be forgotten about because you can not cater to those problems to your first roof when you implement an overlay. With an overlay you are just adding something on top of those problems; a temporary fix. After you add an overlay to your home, then it is going to be quite difficult to find out where leaks are coming from since there are now two roofs on your home. If you live in a climate with a severe rainy season, then overlaying your home instead of replacing it might not be the best choice for you.

Additionally, overlaying is not necessarily the option for everyone. If you are dealing with heavy problems such as curling or broken shingles, then overlaying your roof is not going to be the best option for you. Additionally, adding an overlaying roof is going to add unnecessary heat to the previous roof that’s lying underneath. That’s going to make the existing roof brittle as time goes on.

There comes a time where you will have to completely replace your roof. When that time comes, you are going to end up paying more to replace the two layers of roofing. Overlaying your roof may have a lower cost upfront, but depending on the current state of your roof you may have to pay more over time in order to keep it in good condition.

Is Overlaying Your Roof Right for You?

Depending on a variety of reasons, overlaying your roof might be the right choice for you. If your roof does not have any major issues, then overlaying your roof might be a good choice since the overlay has a stronger foundation to hold to. If you are dealing with major water damage, mildew, moss, or missing shingles then you may just want to completely redo your roof.

If you are having the tire roof done instead of a partial section of the roof, then you may choose to overlay your roof. If you are just looking for a partial section of your roof, then overlaying your roof will make that one section thicker than the rest of your roof. This can lead to serious problems as time goes by, and it also is quite unappealing as well. Additionally, if your roof has already been overlaid in the past then you should not do it again.

Overlaying your roof is a choice that many homeowners choose to make throughout the lifespan of your home. Go over the previously mentioned pros and cons in order to understand whether overlaying your roof would be the right choice for you. Overlaying can easily cater to a small budget while giving your roof’s lifespan an extra boost, but they also may add to a larger cost and more maintenance in the long run. It all depends on what you are looking for as a homeowner, and how you imagine the future of your roof heading. If you are still unsure whether you need an overlay, then try to ask a professional roofing company for help. They will be able to look over the current condition of your roof and help you make the decision over whether your roof will be able to withstand the effects that an overlay may bring.

6 Tips for Spring Cleaning Your Roof

Spring is the perfect time to get some fresh air and prepare your home for the beautiful and optimistic season ahead. Whether you are a renter in a cold-weather, expensive city like Chicago; or a homeowner in Minnesota or a property manager in Dallas,  Your roof is an incredibly important part of your house and it deserves your love just as much as the inside of your house does. Spring cleaning your roof will help repair your roof from the harsh conditions that the winter can bring so your roof can be the best it possibly once the springtime comes. Interested in learning more about protecting your roof? Read on to learn about tips that can fully strengthen your roof to protect you and your family through the warmer months.

1. Check Your Roof From the Inside

Sometimes, the best thing that you can do is check your roof from the inside. It’s one of the most looked over tasks by homeowners. They often think that you can see all of your roof’s shortcomings from the outside, but that’s just not the case. You can easily check around for mold and mildew growth when you’re looking at your from the attic. If you see any light coming from the outside that may be the first chance of witnessing a leak in your roof. Additionally, if you smell something but don’t see anything; don’t ignore it. That may be a hint of an inner source of damage. Take note of it for later and hire a professional in order to take a better look at it.

2. Examine Your Shingles

When it comes to your roof, the shingles are the first line of protection. Shingles are the flat, rectangular shapes that overlap to fully protect your roof. Checking out your shingles will help you understand what exactly you need to fix throughout your roof in order to strengthen your roof for the warmer months. We recommend that you don’t get on top of your roof in order to check out your shingles. This can end up being very dangerous, especially if you’re completing the task alone. Do the best examination that you can from the ground.

Keep a lookout for any gaps in the shingles or loose shingles that look like they’re about to fly away. These shingles are often the ones that need to be replaced fully. Loose shingles often come from bad installation or poor ventilation. Also, be sure to look out for shingles with weird staining as well. Stained shingles might be evidence that your roof has a leak or the ventilation system throughout your roof is broken. The shingles are what hold your roof together so it’s important that they stay in tip-top shape at all times.

3. Clean Out Your Gutters

After the winter season, your gutters are probably filled with debris and gunk. This is exactly why you need to take the time out to clean them. If your gutters are clogged they won’t be able to do the job that they’re made to do; drain your roof of precipitation. While you’re cleaning, you should look for evidence of wear and tear on your gutters. Things like rust and corrosion are signs that you might have to get your gutters replaced. If you do, then don’t procrastinate on the task. Gutters are an important part of your home and could lead to dire circumstances in the long run.

roof spring cleaning

4. Trim Nearby Branches

One of the biggest enemies against your roof is often nearby trees and their branches. This is often where most of the debris is coming from and what’s clogging your gutters and taking over your roof. Also, if those branches are close enough to your roof they can scrap it and damage the protective granules on top of the shingles. If you have the proper equipment to trim those branches in a safe manner then you may be able to take on this task yourself. But, if you aren’t confident in those abilities then hiring a professional arborist would do the trick just the same. It’s best to take care of this task before the full bloom of spring hits so you can have less foliage to deal with.

5. Clear Away Debris

Whether it’s dirt, leaves, or other debris, getting that gunk off of your roof can do nothing but help the quality of your roof. Also, since that debris is often unsightly to look at, cleaning the debris can give it a brand new look for the new season. Along the way, make sure that you’re using a cleaning substance that’s specified for roofs in particular. For example, bleach can strip away the color of your roof and damage your roofing materials.

6. Get Rid of Mold

If you see that your shingles are discolored, you might be dealing with mold. Mold can be very destructive to your roof. Dealing with mold is even more prevalent if you’re living in a wetter climate than usual. Some of the home remedies that you can try out on the mold are lead control strips or utilizing zine on the affected areas. If your mold was caught early enough, then these home remedies may be the only things that you need to take care of the problem. If it’s covered a large area of your roof, then you may need to call a professional roofer. Once the mold seeps deeper into your home it could negatively affect you and your family’s health. It’s important to be proactive towards mold so you don’t have to be reactive in the long run.

Winter can be a very harsh season. Your roof is often the first line of defense against these harsh conditions, so taking the time to clean your roof in time for the spring season is very important. Each of these tasks prepares your roof for the season ahead and repairs it from the storms and precipitations that may have happened throughout the winter. Often, you spring clean the inside of your house, why not spring clean the outside of your house as well? It will save you a lot of time, stress, and money that comes from neglecting one of the most important parts of your home: the roof.

 

 

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Need A New Roof? Here Are Some Factors That’ll Determine The Cost

There are a variety of factors that will determine when it’s time to purchase a new roof. If your roof is over 20 years old, there’s a good chance it needs to be replaced. Also, if you have water leaks, it’s a sign that you need a new roof. Getting a new roof is expensive regardless of the materials you choose or what roofing contractor you hire. In this article, we’re going to look at some things to think about that will determine the price of your new roof.

Size

By far, the most critical factor that determines how much your new roof is going to cost is the size. Larger roofs mean higher costs because of the material and labor involved.

Slope & Pitch

The pitch of your roof (sometimes called the angle) is the number of inches it rises vertically for every 12 inches it extends horizontally. If the pitch is steep, it can be dangerous for workers who may need extra equipment, which can also add to the cost of the job. The roof’s slope is the amount of incline or the measurement of the rise of the roof to the run of the roof. Again, as with the pitch, if this angle is steep, it may hamper the ability of the workers and will cause cost to rise.

Peaks & Valleys

The valley of a roof is the shape that’s made from the channel that goes up and down the folds of the roof. The peak is the sloped edge that forms where two sections of the roof come together. When you have peaks and valleys in your roof, it adds to the cost of construction because they require precise work in to prevent a leak from developing. Shoddy work done on the peaks and valleys will shorten the lifespan of your roof and require more frequent repairs. Getting high-quality work on these parts requires certain expertise that you’re going to have to pay more for if you want it done right.

Roof Access

Another factor in the cost of your new roof is how easy it’s going to be for workers to get materials to the roof. If the crew can park a truck in your yard or driveway and haul materials straight up, then it’s going to be cheaper than if they have to haul materials in from the road or from any long distance away.

Materials

Perhaps one of the most significant factors in determining the cost of your new roof will be the material you choose for your shingles. There are a wide variety of materials to choose from, each with its advantages and disadvantages.

Roof work

Asphalt shingles are the most common material used in residential homes, and they’re the most inexpensive because they’re ubiquitous and easy to install. Asphalt comes in a wide range of colors and styles, and most contractors will have no trouble installing them. However, they do wear out more quickly than other materials, which means you’ll be replacing your roof more frequently.

Clay and concrete are becoming popular because of the unique look they offer. Both clay and concrete last a long time, but they’re heavy and require beefed up framing, which adds to the expense. Metal is also very popular because it offers a nice bridge between asphalt and clay. Metal is extremely durable and resists most everything that Mother Nature throws at it. However, like clay, it’s also an expensive material.

Roofing Layers

In most cases, you’re going to have to remove the old roof in order to replace it entirely. The time it takes to remove the old roof also affects the cost. If your roof has multiple layers, it’s going to take more time, which means more money in labor costs. Also, depending on the material involved, there’s likely to be recycling or disposal fees involved, both of which will come out of your pocket.

Extras

In addition to putting on a new roof, do you also need ventilation, skylights, chimneys, solar panels or any other extras? If so, these are going to add to the cost of the roof in both materials and labor. And in some cases, you may need a specialist for installation, which can jack up the price even further.

Roof System Repair

Putting on a new roof often involves repairs made to the roof system itself, which merely means the support structure that may have rotted due to water damage. While the cost of materials to repair these systems is generally inexpensive, you’re going to be on the hook for the labor costs.

Ice Protection

If you want your roof to last a long time, then you want to be sure it can adequately protect against ice dams. An ice dam occurs when the snow melts and then refreezes along the edge of the roof. And while this looks pretty, it’s actually detrimental to your roof because of the water leaks they create. It’s estimated that ice dams cause millions of dollars in damage to US homeowners every year, so making sure you have adequate protection means a higher expense.

Warranty

There are two types of warranties that you can get on your roof: the standard roofing warranty where the contractor stands behind the work they performed, and the extended no dollar limit (NDL) warranty, which is backed up by the manufacturer. To get the extended NDL warranty, an inspection will need to be performed to ensure that the contractor took the proper steps and completed above par work. This inspection also adds costs to your roof. Consider getting a contractor that offers NDL warranties because you’ll ultimately be getting better craftsmanship and a roof that’s going to hold up longer.

Getting a new roof is expensive no matter how you slice it. However, if you invest the money now, it’s going to save you down the road because you won’t have as many repairs and the roof will last longer.

What Is Roof Certification?

Roof certification is conducted by a licensed roofer who inspects the roof to assess its condition. Typically, this inspection is performed on the exterior as well as the interior of the roof. The inspector takes down information as well as photographs from a variety of angles to determine if there are leaks or other damage and then gives you an estimate on the state of the roof.

This process is helpful for people who are looking at purchasing a new home and don’t want to get stuck with expensive roofing repairs in a year.

Keep in mind. However, a roof certification isn’t a guarantee, but rather the opinion of the roofer you hired to do the job. Two different roofing contractors may give two different opinions regarding the state of your roof, so be aware of that fact when deciding whether or not to pay for the service.

When to Get a Roof Certification

When you’re in the market for a new home, one thing you’re going to want to know is how stable is the roof of the house you’re looking to purchase. The last thing you want is to buy a home and to find out a year later that the roof leaks and is need of replacement.

roofing companies

You should know that in many cases, a roof inspection isn’t included in the routine inspection of the house, and the condition of the roof may not be written down in your contract, and depending on where you live, your seller may not have to repair the roof before selling you the home.

Having said all that, a roofing certification isn’t always necessary. For example, depending on the market and your need to buy a home, you might find your dream property that happens to have a shoddy roof. If the price is right, then you might forego the roofing certification and just factor in a new roof to your budget. If, on the other hand, the market favors the buyer, you can opt for a roofing certification in the event that you might find an issue, which can drive down the price.

Another thing to keep in mind is that, in some cases, your homeowner’s insurance company may require you to get a roofing certification before they issue you a policy for the home you’re purchasing.

Do You Really Need a Roof Certification?

As mentioned above, you don’t need a roofing certification, however, it can be a good idea to get one to assess the state of the roof and let you know if you’re going to have to begin saving for a new roof now or if it’s something you can put off until later. Also, as stated, a roofing certification isn’t a guarantee, it’s an opinion of the particular contractor you hired to do the job. While one contractor might tell you the roof has a good three to five years left, another one might see things differently and suggest that you replace the roof as soon as possible.

In many cases, getting a roof certification is like getting a diagnosis from a doctor; you may want to get a second opinion just to be sure, especially when you’re talking about the expense of putting on a new roof.

How Do Roofing Certifications Work?

When you hire a roofer to perform a roofing certification, they’ll consider a variety of factors to determine whether or not your roof is in good shape and will stand up over time. Your roofer will look at:

  • The type of roof and materials used
  • How old is the roof
  • The roof’s pitch
  • How many layers are involved
  • Any prior roofing repairs
  • All of this information will be documented along with photographs of any problem areas that go into the contractor’s final determination.

Benefits of a Roof Certification

So, you don’t always need a roofing certification, and getting one is no guarantee that the roof is going to last as long as the inspector says, however, there are many benefits to getting one.

  • Detect Water Damage It’s tough to tell just by looking at the exterior of the roof whether there’s been any water damage, but a good inspector will see it and let you know if it’s going to involve a major or minor repair to fix it.
  • Saves Money Although you’re going to be shelling out money for the cost of hiring a roofing inspector, it’s peanuts when compared to the money you can save by detecting small problems before they become big, expensive fixes down the road.
  • Provides Protection As stated, getting a roofing certification gives you a degree of protection should it come time to file a roofing claim with your homeowner’s insurance company. Also in that regards, if you’ve been through a rough storm that’s caused damage to your home, a roofing certification will prove beneficial when dealing with your insurance company because you’ll have an expert’s idea of just how severe the damage is.
  • Extends Roof’s Lifespan It’s a good idea to have regular inspections performed on your roof because it allows you to find problems and fix them quickly. Little issues like broken shingles or water damage can be repaired relatively inexpensively, but if you let them go, they can become much more expensive to fix down the road.

What a Roofing Certification Isn’t

It’s important to keep in mind that a roofing certification isn’t a guarantee or a warranty on your roof — it’s just a person’s opinion. Remember that just because you have a roofing certification that says your roof is good for another three years, your roofing contractor likely won’t honor that if your roof suffered damage due to a natural disaster or damage caused by a worker installing a satellite dish.

A roofing certification is an excellent way to give you an idea as to the state of the roof, and it’s a quick and relatively inexpensive process that you should consider when you’re looking at purchasing a new home.

 

Getting a Roof Replacement? Here’s How To Save Some Money

A roof is expensive, but a necessary investment for your home. And when it comes time to replace your roof, you want the best quality, but you also want to get a reasonable price as well.

It’s estimated that a typical asphalt roofing job for a residential home can range from $8,000 to $16,500. And while there are a variety of factors that go into determining the price, we’re going to take a look at ways you can save a few bucks without sacrificing quality work.

Research & Learn

Thanks to the Internet, you have access to virtually every piece of information regarding roofing. Before you even talk to a roofing contractor, research materials, labor costs, and terminology, so you know exactly what you agree to when you negotiate. Also, keep in mind that you’ll likely have disposal fees and recycling fees to contend with when tearing down your old roof, so make sure you know approximately what those should be in your area before you agree to a price. Being informed means, you’re less likely to be taken advantage of.

Get a Roof Inspection

Getting a professional to come in and expect your roof is an excellent idea because it gives you a clear picture of the work that needs to be done. We’re not saying that all contractors are shady, far from it, but it’s better to know the work that needs to be performed by a third party rather than someone who may be trying to get a little more money out of you by selling you on something you may not need.

Getting a roofing inspector is relatively inexpensive, and you can generally get one for under $300. An inspector will be able to pinpoint any damage and advise you on whether you need a full-on roof replacement or if you can get by with a minor repair for now.

Lastly, when you hire an inspector, make sure you get someone who’s not associated with a company you may employ to do the work. As we said, they may not be as unbiased in their recommendation as you would like.

Repair or Replace

This goes hand-in-hand with getting a roof inspection because a proper inspection will help you decide whether you need a full-blown replacement or if you can get by with a repair. In many cases, what seems like a significant problem such as water leakage can be fixed with relatively inexpensive repairs.

Of course, you’ll eventually have to replace your roof at some point, but there’s no reason for spending the money now if you don’t have to. Repairing now allows you to begin setting aside money for when you’re going to replace it down the road.

Check For Warranties

Depending on when you purchased your home, there may be a warranty that’s attached to the roof from a previous replacement. If you don’t have this information, contact the previous owners and ask. Some roofs also come with manufacturer’s warranties, so be sure to check for that as well.

Depending on whether your roof has any warranty coverage will determine how much you have to spend to repair or replace it.

Get Plenty of Estimates

Just like when you’re shopping for a vehicle, it’s a good idea to shop around to try and get the best price. Most people have access to a variety of roofing contractors where they live, and you’re not doing anything wrong by getting estimates from all of them. Ask if they offer any warranties on their work and be careful of extremely low bids because that might indicate that you’re going to get substandard work.

Also, depending on how long you’ve lived in the neighborhood, you should ask your neighbors who they recommend to do the work. Chances are someone on your street had a roof replaced and will gladly point you in the right direction.

roof replacement

Check Out Financing Options

Because roof replacement can be so expensive, many of us don’t have that kind of cash laying around, and putting it on a credit card isn’t always the best option unless you have an amazing interest rate.

So, check out to see what financing options are available either through your bank or through the roofing manufacturer.

Of course, unless the roof is entirely shot, you’re probably better off doing a minor roof repair that’s going to buy you a year or two, and then begin budgeting so you can pay cash for that roof in a few years instead of having to finance and pay the extra fees.

Consider Alternate Materials

Just because your home came with an asphalt roof doesn’t mean you have to stick with that. True, asphalt is the most common and least expensive roofing material, which will save you money, but often there are incentives for going with different material such as something more energy efficient. You may get tax breaks and breaks on your homeowner’s insurance depending on the material you choose. And, you may end up getting a roof that lasts longer, which means you’ll save money from not having to replace it more frequently.

Consider The Timing

Most people opt for putting roofs on in the summer or early fall, which is when the contractors are the busiest, which means you’ll pay more. If you time your roofing project for early spring or early winter, you’ll likely get a much better deal on the labor.

DIY

If you’re handy, and if you have the time, try doing some of the work yourself. Removing the old roofing material before your contractor begins work saves them time and saves you money on labor costs.

Any way you slice it, a new roof is going to be expensive, but with a little planning, a little education and consideration, you can get a price that’s easier to handle than if you went in blind and went with the first estimate you were given.

 

 

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The Differences Between Commercial and Residential Roofing

The idea of roofing in and of itself appears simple: people get on top of a roof and install whatever roofing is necessary for a specific building. But there are specific roofing procedures for residential buildings and commercial buildings. From roof repairs in Frisco, TX to commercial roof installations in Long Beach, CA, there is a multitude of differences between residential and commercial roofing. In terms of materials used, labor, and design, there is a multitude of differences between residential and commercial roofing.

Materials Used in Residential Roofs Compared to Commercial Roofs

Because commercial structures often house many more things than a residential structure, they use different materials. While it is true that both of them can use one or two of the same materials, the rest of the materials used in residential roofs and commercial roofs are much different.

One thing that both of them can use is asphalt shingles. This is especially true if the commercial structure has the same kind of design as a residential structure. This is seen in many commercial structures that make up strip malls, as the designs of the structures in those places often resemble the same kind of design as certain residences. In this case, roofers are often directed to use the same kinds of materials to install the roof.

When it comes to very large warehouses, shopping centers, or any other building that covers a lot of land and houses a lot of things, the materials completely change. Instead of using asphalt shingles, or clay shingles, roofers are often instructed to use metal roofing materials. This is completely different from asphalt roofing in that the metal as a roofing material is much more durable and can withstand a lot more impact than asphalt roofing material.

The Design of Commercial Roofs Compared to Residential Roofs

People in residential areas have options when it comes to the color or the general design of the roofs that they wish to install. Additionally, because most residences are not places of business, oftentimes there is no real stake in the long term existence of the building. For purposes of the content here, long-term is at least 50 years. Because people who own commercial buildings have a lot of stake in the long term maintenance of their buildings, they typically are low sloped or flat.

Because of this, people who own commercial buildings often do not have a choice when it comes to the design of their roofs. Additionally, even the owners of strip malls are forced to follow a specific design for their building. The next time you drive by a strip mall, pay some attention to how the roofs are designed on them. You should notice that they possess the exact same design for their roofs. This is done for a reason, and that reason is that when everything is consistent in the design of a roof for a collection of buildings, everything costs less, which is very important when it comes to commercial roofing.

Labor and Costs Associated with Residential Roofing Compared to Commercial Roofing

Perhaps the biggest difference between residential roofing and commercial roofing are the numbers associated with the labor and the costs. As mentioned in the strip mall example, there are times where a residential roof and a commercial roof can look similar. On some rare occasions, they can look the exact same. However, that is where all similarities end because there is a much different procedure with residential roofing when compared against commercial roofing.

Residential roofing still utilizes a lot of resources to construct and install the roof. This is important to understand, but commercial buildings and roofing utilize even more resources and require a lot more money to install and maintain the roof.

The most obvious difference between commercial and residential buildings in the area, which of course adds to the cost of anything. But there are also a number of things that commercial buildings need to deal with when they are getting their roofs installed and repaired. But there are other a host of other things that comprise the labor and costs associated with commercial roofing that is not issued in residential roofing.

A lot of commercial roofs, especially the ones that represent bigger buildings such as warehouses and shopping centers, need other things installed that are not one ounce relevant to residences. The best example of these is piping, smokestacks, and airflow systems. These are things that definitely exist and can be options in residences in the form of chimneys and fireplaces, but they are much more common (and necessary in some cases) for commercial buildings.

Residential and commercial roofing both follow the same kind of process: install a new roof on top of a new building. The idea is the same, and there are some instances where there are similar materials being used. The major differences between commercial and residential roofing have to do with their labor and costs, the materials used, and the designs of the roofs. These three factors make up the core of the difference between commercial and residential roofs.

Again, it is possible that a commercial roof can resemble a residential roof. Passing by a strip mall will prove this. However, that is when the similarities end. When it comes to large commercial buildings such as shopping centers, warehouses, and even some major business buildings, the roofing is often completely different than a residence. This is because commercial buildings are built with the intention of having them stand for many decades. For that reason, the roofs for these buildings are often made of metal, as opposed to the asphalt that comprises the majority of residences.

Commercial roofs cost much more to install because they cover much more area. They also use certain roofing accessories that certain residential roofs typically do not use, such as smokestacks and piping.

Best Metal Roofing for Residential Homes

The roof on your house needs to be strong, sturdy, and reliable. Metal roofing can be a great option for your home because it does all three, and it does them extremely well. No matter what the weather’s like where you live, having a metal roof would benefit you. These roofs can withstand storms, extreme weather changes, and snow extremely well. If you’re thinking about buying a metal roof for your home, you might be thinking about what specific metal you’d like to utilize for your home. Read on to figure out the pros and the cons of each material, and figure out which one is the right one for you.

Types of Metal

There are a couple of different choices you have when it comes to the metal that you can choose for your roof. The most popular options are various types of steels, aluminum, copper, and zinc. There are also metals that are combinations of the few. All of these types of roofs have various pros and cons that will either convince you to purchase them or push you away.

Steel is the material that is most used in residential homes. That fact probably has a lot to do with its low cost. But often, galvanized steel (a low cost, thinner version) can corrode very easily when it’s exposed to heavy amounts of saltwater. In turn, you probably don’t want to use this material for homes that are by the water (beach homes, etc.) The prices of steel depend on the type of steel that you’re getting. If you’re looking at stone-coated steel it starts at about $400 dollars a square. If you’re trying to get steel shingles, that might be about $270 a square. But typically, if you’re not trying to go for the fancy stuff, ordering steel for your roof is going to set you back at least $300 dollars a square. If installed right, your steel roof should last you at least 50 years.

Aluminum is the second most popular steel for roofing. It’s so popular because it’s more durable than steel, while only being a fraction of the price of premium steels like copper and zinc. When it comes to how it would fair in a coastal home, aluminum works a completely different way than steel does. If you’re living in a place by the beach, then aluminum would be the best choice for your home. It’s often thought of as a step up from steel when it comes to the quality. In turn, you’re going to have to give up a bit more cash. In general, it costs about $100 more per square than steel. Along with steel, aluminum will also last you at least 50 years.

The most expensive metals and the most durable of the bunch are definitely copper and zinc. These are roofs that could last hundreds of years with the proper care. But, if you’re looking for that longevity, you’re going to have to cough up some serious coin. They both cost about $900 to $1400 dollars a square. Because of the pricing, most people don’t make roofs that are fully out of copper. They usually just use it for accents throughout the home. But hey, if you’ve got enough money to pay for a fully copper or zinc roof then be my guest. If you’re trying to calculate the full cost of setting up your copper or zinc roof, it usually will be around $1800 for materials and labor per square.

Benefits of Having a Metal Roof

No matter what type of metal you’d prefer to use, they’re going to bring most of the same benefits. When it comes to the horrors of the winter season like ice dams and snow, a metal roof is going to be your best protection against it. They are thought of like ice and snow shedding system, so you’re not going to have to worry about roof leaks. Speaking of weather, these roofs can withstand hurricane-level winds. That makes them great for people who live in states where hurricanes are more prevalent.

The durability of metal roofs is what separates them from other types of roofs. You won’t have to worry about it cracking, rotting, or splitting. You’re also not going to find any creatures or rodents in your roof. They’re not going to survive on metal. It’s fire-resistant, so you won’t have to worry about it like you would for a wood or asphalt roof. Whether you’re dealing with a hailstorm or sticks from overhead trees, it’s not going to damage the roof. This roof can handle almost anything that life might throw at it. When it comes to maintenance, you won’t have too many problems. The credit goes to the material’s incredible durability.

When you have a metal roof, you’ll see a difference in your energy bill. You can save at least 25%, due to the roof’s reflective nature. Copper and zinc aren’t as energy efficient as aluminum and steel. But, when you’re talking about energy-saving capability, it’s a lot better than dealing with asphalt. If you’re interested in saving the environment and reducing the amount of waste you produce, having a metal roof would be a great option. It uses the least amount of resources and can always be recycled. It can be recycled hundreds of times without worry about the material corroding. That means that it’ll never end up in a landfill once it reaches the end of its lifespan, reducing the country’s waste. Choosing a metal roof is one of the greenest choices that you can make when you’re finalizing your home.

Choosing the material of your roof can be difficult. There are pros and cons to each type of metal. But, they all are specialized enough that you can pick the perfect one for you from the choices given. Whether you choose steel or copper, metal roofs provide great benefits for your home that your family will love and adore for years and years to come.

 

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